Finding Justice: Life in America for the Wrongfully Convicted

Finding Justice: Life in America for the Wrongfully Convicted

It was a dreary, overcast day in Memphis. A woman awoke that morning in her apartment, to find that two men had broken in. One of them was holding a knife. Later, she would give the police a description, a name and an address. But that night, before the men left her home, the men assaulted her and took her television set.

It was October 2, 1977.

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Interview with an FSU Alum

Interview with an FSU Alum

From one Fitchburg State student to another, what was your experience like attending Fitchburg State University?

My experience was amazing, mostly due to the fact that my father and I attended together. We had a lot of projects together that really worked out well.  It was amazing to watch my father excel. He had so much knowledge when he got there from plumbing and building houses that everything just wove together for him at FSU. One project my father and I worked on together was a windmill. When we tested how much power it could generate, we found out that it had 2-3 times more electricity than that of anyone else in our class. At Fitchburg State, my father utilized all of his prior knowledge to gain as much information ashe could. He was actually awarded the Puritan Award for exceptional craftsmanship.

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Wrestling Diaries

Wrestling Diaries

BY GREGORY PATROLIA

I met Rick on the first day of wrestling practice during my sophomore year of high school. I noticed him as soon as he entered the locker room, because he looked around the same weight and height as me, so I knew I would probably be paired with him. We started our regular sprints and warm up exercises. I was sure to keep an extra eye on Rick to ensure my varsity spot wouldn't be snatched up right before my eyes. He was a strong kid, and could most definitely beat me any day in a push up contest.

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Your Life and Mine

Your Life and Mine

BY: CAMELIA REID

If I was given the chance to have a 30-minute conversation with any person in history it would be Ruby Nell Bridges. She was an African American civil rights activist and the first African American child to end a policy of racial segregation in William Frantz Elementary School. Ruby receives my utmost admiration because as a child her story was the easiest to comprehend and build an emotional connection with when learning about civil rights.

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